A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy, Volume 1: The Period of the Enlightenment (Supplements to The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy, Volume 14)

A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy, Volume 1: The Period of the Enlightenment (Supplements to The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy, Volume 14)

Eliezer Schweid

Language: English

Pages: 381

ISBN: 2:00284394

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A comprehensive, interdisciplinary account of the major thinkers and movements in modern Jewish thought, in the context of general philosophy and Jewish social-political historical developments. Volume 1 (of 5) covers the period from Spinoza through the Enlightenment.

Sextus Empiricus: Outlines of Scepticism (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy)

The Thirst for Annihilation: Georges Bataille and Virulent Nihilism

The Matter and Form of Maimonides' Guide

On Vision and Colors: Color Sphere

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creator and Ruler over nature, and religion (or Torah) is His direct commandment. It is clear, then, that religion, in the sense of monotheism (whether Biblical or rabbinic), cannot be incarnated in philosophy in such a way that the latter will occupy the whole place of religion, in the same way that philosophy took the place of pagan religion. Monotheistic religion presents a separate truth, a truth that rests on the authority of revelation. Philosophy must relate to religion, and religion must

there always arose several great centers from which Torah emanated to the whole people. These centers stood 40 introduction in close reciprocal relation to each other. Even though competitive tensions and varying tendencies developed among them, there was always one leading center that stood out in terms of its preeminent halakhic authority, whose influence shaped the Jewish way of life and the common circle of intellectual discourse, uniting the entire people. These centers developed

manner of presentation, as well as the difference between Mendelssohn and Leibnitz. Leibnitz agreed with Spinoza in preferring Christianity over Judaism on rationalist grounds. At this point Mendelssohn parted ways with Leibnitz, reverting to the Jewish rationalist tradition from Saadia to Albo, which rejected certain elements of Christian dogma on the basis of rational argument. Mendelssohn’s Disagreements with Spinoza and Lessing The clear verdict on this tangled issue is found in Mendelssohn’s

Christianity .................................................. Leibnitz’s Monadology and Philosophy of Religion ............. Moses Mendelssohn: Enlightenment, Common Sense, and Tolerance ................................................................... Mendelssohn’s Phaidon and Jerusalem ...................................... Mendelssohn’s Disagreements with Spinoza and Lessing ..... Mendelssohn on Religion and State in Judaism and Christianity

than either Spinoza’s or Mendelssohn’s. This helps to explain the personal bitterness that formed the background of his odd reclusiveness, which was not an ordinary reclusiveness but an expression of ambivalent protest—reminiscent in many ways of Micha Josef Berdyczewski’s relation to his Jewishness. From Hasidic Village to the Streets of Western Culture Maimon was born and educated in an isolated traditional Jewish community in Poland, and until a relatively mature age had no opportunity for an

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