Algorithms Sequential & Parallel: A Unified Approach (3rd Edition)

Algorithms Sequential & Parallel: A Unified Approach (3rd Edition)

Laurence Boxer, Russ Miller

Language: English

Pages: 450

ISBN: 1133366805

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Equip yourself for success with a state-of-the-art approach to algorithms available only in Miller/Boxer's ALGORITHMS SEQUENTIAL AND PARALLEL: A UNIFIED APPROACH, 3E. This unique and functional text gives you an introduction to algorithms and paradigms for modern computing systems, integrating the study of parallel and sequential algorithms within a focused presentation. With a wide range of practical exercises and engaging examples drawn from fundamental application domains, this book prepares you to design, analyze, and implement algorithms for modern computing systems.

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materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Notation and Terminology 9 y = f(n) y = C'g(n) y = Cg(n) y = g(n) n0(C) n0(C') An illustration of ω -notation: f (n) = ω (g(n)). n0(C) is the value of n0 in the definition of ω -notation for the pair ( f (n), Cg(n)). Similarly, n0(C ') is the value of n0 in the definition of ω -notation for the pair ( f (n), C

cards, we still need only 13 bins. Given one complete deck of cards, each bin will wind up with exactly 4 cards in it. An example of Bin Sort is presented in Figure 1-12. Below, we present BinSort, an implementation of the Bin Sort algorithm, where we assume that the data values to be ordered are in the range from 1 to n. It is known that Ω(n log n) comparisons are required to sort an arbitrary set of data by a comparison-based sort, so the reader should note that Bin Sort is not a

chapter, we introduce the related notions of mathematical induction and recursion. Mathematical induction is a technique for proving statements about sets of successive integers. Often, the set of concern takes the form of all integers greater than or equal to an initial integer. This is done by proving a base case and then proving that the truth of a successor case follows from the truth of its predecessor. Recursion is a technique of solving problems by dividing the original problem into

algorithm is Θ(1), regardless of the number of processors. Copyright 2013 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights

middle of a solution strategy. Formally, we are given a unique set of data, D = [d1, d2, . . . , dn1/2], distributed one per processor along the first row of the base mesh in a mesh-of-trees such that processor P1,i stores di. We wish to sort the data so that the ith largest element in D will be stored in processor P1,i. The method we use will be that of Counting Sort. That is, for each element d ∈ D, we will count the number of elements smaller than d in order to determine the final position of

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