Business Planning Pocketbook

Business Planning Pocketbook

Neil Russell-Jones

Language: English

Pages: 128

ISBN: 190661072X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Business Planning Pocketbook (3rd Edition) explains what issues to address, how to write a business plan, what questions to ask, how much detail to include and the time-frame to adopt. In the chapter on planning theory the author identifies eight different planning styles, followed in the next chapter with a description of the seven stages of the planning process. In his summary the author says: 'A plan is a statement of what you intend to achieve, how, when and with what resources'. A complex subject made simple.

Investing in the Renewable Power Market: How to Profit from Energy Transformation

The ADA Practical Guide to Dental Office Design (2nd Edition)

The Halo Effect: ... and the Eight Other Business Delusions That Deceive Managers

Strategic Integrated Marketing Communications

Agile ALM: Lightweight tools and Agile strategies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

shall make a plan. He would subsequently carry out the task successfully. Planning is taking time to: ● Consider the possibilities that might arise as a result of something that you wish to do ● Understand the consequences that arise, and ● Develop actions to counter them or to maximise opportunities 3 INTRODUCTION WHO SHOULD USE THIS BOOK? Planning takes place in all organisations in some form or other, whether it be formal or informal, and at a variety of levels. Most planning is

past IT departments were out of proportion with the organisation, but with increased IT literacy of management this is less so than before. IT must support the business and not be a means to its own end. It should be controlled rigidly by the business. Key questions for inclusion in the IT strategy part of the plan include: ● What do we have? ● Does it support the business? ● What is its life? (IT projects are often measured in years) ● Is it millennium compliant? (Only of relevance until

cashflow will enable you to predict your financing needs, allowing you to establish facilities in advance when lenders are more sympathetic, rather than afterwards, when they will be less so. ● Producing a cashflow forecast allows you to demonstrate that you have thought through the flows of cash (not funds or profit). Interested parties can then challenge your assumptions; your answers to these challenges will give them confidence that the assumptions, and therefore the forecast, are likely to

Salaries Rent Rates Assets purchase Creditors Tax Drawings/dividends xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx Closing balance 45 72 96 (123) 50 83 87 (123) 67 96 123 48 MONTH Opening balance This enables financing needs (months

remember to make your message stand out. Adopt a pyramidal approach: 82 ● Key message in the summary ● Supporting points in the main body ● Real details in the appendices ● Allow readers to drill down to the level they require ● Summary is a stand-alone document PRACTICAL PLANNING COMMUNICATING A PLAN You must tailor the level of information to ensure that you hold attention. Do not clutter it with inessential detail. TYPICAL PLAN Key points level of interest Too much detail IDEAL

Download sample

Download