Dissonant Voices in Soviet Literature

Dissonant Voices in Soviet Literature

Boris Pasternak, Isaac Babel, Alexander Grin, Mikhail Zoshchenko, Boris Pilnyak, Sergei Esenin, Ilya Ehrenburg, Ivan Kharabarov,

Language: English

Pages: 358

ISBN: B000LY4DOE

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


That's right.

Contents
Introduction by Max Hayward, vii
BORIS PASTERNAK
Without Love, 3
EVGENI ZAMYATIN
On Literature, Revolution, and Entropy,
VICTOR SHKLOVSKY
Form and Material in Art, 20
SERGEI ESENIN
Soviet Russia, 29
KONSTANTIN PAUSTOVSKY
Reminiscences of Babel, 33
ISAAC BABEL
The Journey, 52
ALEXANDER GRIN
The Making of Asper, 62
BORIS PASTERNAK
M.Ts., 71
BORIS PILNYAK
Mahogany, 74
MIKHAIL ZOSHCHENKO
Before Sunrise, 108
VLADIMIR POLYAKOV
Fireman ProMiorchuk or The Story of a Story, 132
LEV KASSIL
The Tale of the Three Master Craftsmen, 137
JULIA NEIMAN
1941, 156
NIKOLAI CHUKOVSKY
The Tramp, 158
IVAN KHARABAROV
Untrodden Path, 185
YURI KAZAKOV
The Outsider, 188
VLADIMIR TENDRYAKOV
Three, Seven, Ace, 205
ILYA EHRENBURG
People, Years, and Life, 236
EVGENI EVTUSHENKO
Babi-Yar, 260
NIKOLAI ARZAK
This Is Moscow Speaking, 262

On Looking: Essays

BiblioTech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google

A Man Without a Country

Everyday Writing Center: A Community of Practice

I Have Landed: Splashes and Reflections in Natural History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

following among all the innumerable jacks-in-office who cannot accept the implications of the exposure of Stalin, because of their own past involvement in his crimes. The affair of Evtushenko’s poem “Babi Yar,” published in the Literary Gazette of September 19, 1961, was an even clearer indication of the division in the ranks of Soviet writers. The reactions to Evtushenko’s vehement denunciation of Russian anti-Semitism were an ominous expression of the Great Rus­ sian chauvinism which

play ( Mystery Bouffe, 1918) which is a brilliant farcical re-enact­ ment of the story of the Flood, with God, Methuselah, Beel­ zebub, and Lloyd George playing minor roles. Mayakovsky’s transposition of the revolutionary drama into biblical lan­ guage was, of course, utterly lighthearted and frivolous compared with Esenin’s anguished blasphemy, but the un­ derlying emotion was much the same and he was thought of by communist critics as a utopian visionary rather than as a “proletarian” poet. As

what is the final integer, the one at the very top, the biggest of all. But that’s ridiculous! Since the number of integers is in­ finite, how can you have a final integer? LITERATURE, REVOLUTION, AND ENTROPY [13 Well then how can you have a final revolution? There is no final revolution. Revolutions are infinite. —Evgeni Zamyatin, We Ask the question point-blank: What is revolution? You get a variety of replies. Some people will answer in the style of Louis XIV: La révolution, cest nous.

make head or tail of it, and I can’t make any sense of the Revolution either, but I don’t mind. I believe in life and in the Revolution and that’s all that matters. I only understand the things that concern me personally and I couldn’t care less about anything else.” A cat walked over the carpet and, in a familiar movement, jumped onto Klavdia’s lap. It had grown dark outside. In the room next door a lamp was lit and a sewing machine began to rattle. Darkness descended on the world. That evening

Eleventhand-Three-Quarters was an extremely frivolous person. He spent so much money dandifying himself that he finally Lev Kassil squandered his entire wealth. His people began saying that he had thrown prudence to the wind, and he was full of hot air, and just a windbag. And they were right. It was because of this that the winds of the whole world decided that King Vainglorious was just the right person for them—the most scatterbrained king in the world. They gathered on the island and

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