Granta 116: Ten Years Later

Granta 116: Ten Years Later

Language: English

Pages: 190

ISBN: B00OX8K08W

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In this issue

Ten years later, where are we looking? How do we see things differently?

From Ground Zero to Kampala to London to Mumbai, the echoes are still heard, the impact is still felt. The way we interact, the way we travel, our relationship to media and technology, and the very way we regard the world we live in have all been irrevocably changed.

Granta 116 will examine the consequences of the attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, from a global perspective. Rather than recounting where we were when it happened and what we saw, this issue will look at how our lives and viewpoints have been altered since that day.

Declan Walsh reports from the tribal areas of northwest Pakistan: breeding ground for al-Qaeda and current target of U.S. drone strikes. Elliott Woods travels across the U.S., talking to recruits, noncombatants and veterans and taking the pulse of a nation a decade at war. Pico Iyer considers what air travel is like in the post-9/11 security state; Nicole Krauss writes a melancholy, impressionistic portrait of family, war, life and death in Paris. The issue also includes fiction from newcomers Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer and Phil Klay as well as an extract of a new novel by Nuruddin Farah about a man who travels to Somalia in search of his son who has joined the jihadist movement.

Showcasing some of the most insightful essayists, fiction writers, poets and visual artists working today, Ten Years Later will explore the complexity of how we regard an event that forever shifted our conceptions of fear, anger and hope.

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tattooed on their chests, while he was a man who wore headphones in the dark of a fish hold on a boat that was twenty-seven days at sea a month. Not that he envied those who rowed in the daylight. The light, the sky, the water, they were all things you looked through during the day. At night, they were things you looked into. You looked into the stars; you looked into dark rollers and the surprising platinum flash of their caps. No one ever stared at the tip of a cigarette in the daylight hours

They would sometimes ask me curiously, ‘My sister, how are you? Where are you from?’ As I stopped to take pictures of them, there was that strange, familiar exchange between photographer and subject, an intimate moment in which both are engaged in each other’s lives, even asking the most personal of questions and then parting ways, never knowing where the other is going, or where they would end up. It is an exchange that serves to put us at ease. At these times, although I rarely ask them if I

always Saddam and the America that this generation has come to know. Often the harshest indictment is from those Baghdad College alumni who knew an older America most intimately. ‘Arrogance and hubris,’ Dave Nona told me. ‘It’s a hubris and arrogance that comes with power, that we know best, that we have the mightiest army, the money, the psychology. That we know best, even if events have shown otherwise.’ I asked Ranz and Quinn what the goals of their initiatives were, of public diplomacy

always Saddam and the America that this generation has come to know. Often the harshest indictment is from those Baghdad College alumni who knew an older America most intimately. ‘Arrogance and hubris,’ Dave Nona told me. ‘It’s a hubris and arrogance that comes with power, that we know best, that we have the mightiest army, the money, the psychology. That we know best, even if events have shown otherwise.’ I asked Ranz and Quinn what the goals of their initiatives were, of public diplomacy

point asking the young man anything. People out here are jittery, their tetchiness priming them to jump to the wrong conclusions. He says to the young man, ‘Get out!’ Alone in the room, the door securely latched from the inside, he unplugs the TV. The sealed envelopes with Taxliil’s photograph and the cash are still in the computer bag – there is no time to make sure that nothing else is missing. He decides to carry these valuables on his person, unable to think of a better way of keeping them

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