Hedda Gabler (Dover Thrift Editions)

Hedda Gabler (Dover Thrift Editions)

Henrik Ibsen

Language: English

Pages: 200

ISBN: 1495220966

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This dark psychological drama was first produced in Norway in 1890 and depicts the evil machinations of a ruthless, nihilistic heroine: the infamous Hedda Gabler. Readers will discover a masterly exploration of the nature of evil, along with the potential for tragedy that lies in human frailty. A true masterpiece.

From School Library Journal
Grade 9 Up-Ibsen's classic is well served by the talents of Juliet Stevenson and seven other British actors, all veterans of the Royal Shakespeare Company, stage, and film. With excellent diction and generally convincing emotion, the polished cast conveys the dark despair that touches everyone in the play, and eventually overwhelms Hedda. Brief, but pleasant music gently marks the end of each act, and sound quality is good throughout. Exceptionally complete liner notes make it easy to find a specific track, and there's plenty of playbill-style information about the performers and the play. While this recordings is not a must buy, it will be a helpful audio component to classes studying the work of Norway's great 19th century playwright.
Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library, Rocky Hill, CT

Review
Drama in four acts by Henrik Ibsen, published in 1890 and produced the following year. The work reveals Hedda Gabler as a selfish, cynical woman bored by her marriage to the scholar Jorgen Tesman. Her father's pair of pistols provide intermittent diversion, as do the attentions of the ne'er-do-well Judge Brack. When Thea Elvestad, a longtime acquaintance of Hedda's, reveals that she has left her husband for the writer Ejlert Lovborg, who once pursued Hedda, the latter becomes vengeful. Learning that Ejlert has forsworn liquor, Hedda first steers him to a rowdy gathering at Brack's and subsequently burns the reputedly brilliant manuscript that he loses there while drunk. Witnessing his desperation, she sends him one of the pistols and he shoots himself. Brack deduces Hedda's complicity and demands that she become his mistress in exchange for his silence about the matter. Instead, she ends her ennui with the remaining pistol. The work is remarkable for its nonjudgmental depiction of an immoral, destructive character, one of the most vividly realized women in dramatic literature. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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only had a home! But I haven't any; I have never had a home. HEDDA. (Looks at her for a moment.) I almost suspected as much. MRS. ELVSTED. (Gazing helplessly before her.) Yes—yes—yes. HEDDA. I don't quite remember—was it not as housekeeper that you first went to Mr. Elvsted's? MRS. ELVSTED. I really went as governess. But his wife—his late wife—was an invalid,—and rarely left her room. So I had to look after the housekeeping as well. HEDDA. And then—at last—you became mistress of the

an end to all that. HEDDA. Who knows? (With a slight smile.) I hear they have reclaimed him up at Sheriff Elvsted's— BRACK. And then this book that he has published— TESMAN. Well well, I hope to goodness they may find something for him to do. I have just written to him. I asked him to come and see us this evening, Hedda dear. BRACK. But my dear fellow, you are booked for my bachelor's party this evening. You promised on the pier last night. HEDDA. Had you forgotten, Tesman? TESMAN.

the long run at any rate. BRACK. Not even—the specialist one happens to love? HEDDA. Faugh—don't use that sickening word! BRACK. (Taken aback.) What do you say, Mrs. Hedda? HEDDA. (Half laughing, half irritated.) You should just try it! To hear of nothing but the history of civilisation, morning, noon, and night— BRACK. Everlastingly. HEDDA. Yes yes yes! And then all this about the domestic industry of the middle ages—! That's the most disgusting part of it! BRACK. (Looks

the long run at any rate. BRACK. Not even—the specialist one happens to love? HEDDA. Faugh—don't use that sickening word! BRACK. (Taken aback.) What do you say, Mrs. Hedda? HEDDA. (Half laughing, half irritated.) You should just try it! To hear of nothing but the history of civilisation, morning, noon, and night— BRACK. Everlastingly. HEDDA. Yes yes yes! And then all this about the domestic industry of the middle ages—! That's the most disgusting part of it! BRACK. (Looks

Falk. HEDDA. Yes, there is an odour of mortality about it. It reminds me of a bouquet—the day after the ball. (Clasps her hands behind her head, leans back in her chair and looks at him.) Oh, my dear Judge—you cannot imagine how horribly I shall bore myself here. BRACK. Why should not you, too, find some sort of vocation in life, Mrs. Hedda? HEDDA. A vocation—that should attract me? BRACK. If possible, of course. HEDDA. Heaven knows what sort of a vocation that could be. I often wonder

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