Life with My Sister Madonna

Life with My Sister Madonna

Christopher Ciccone, Wendy Leigh

Language: English

Pages: 342

ISBN: 1416587624

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Ciccone's extraordinary memoir is based on his life and forty-seven years of growing up with and working with his sister - the most famous woman in the world.

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dance in these fucking bones,” but still does. The dress is also extremely tight, and when I disrobe her, her body is covered in red marks as if she were a medieval martyr scourged in the service of her faith. By now, I’ve got the change of clothes and the whole backstage operation down pat. I am braced to ignore all the tirades Madonna unleashes on me practically every time she storms offstage. I know how to cope on every level, and she trusts me implicitly, secure in the knowledge that she can

pose happily for press pictures together. Clearly aware that the cameras are on hand to immortalize the tableau, Sandra rests her head on Madonna’s shoulder, while Madonna runs her fingers through Sandra’s hair. On July 1, 1988, Madonna makes a surprise, unscheduled appearance on Late Night with David Letterman on which Sandra is guesting. The reason, of course, is publicity; Ciao Italia: Live from Italy has been released on home video and, just weeks after her Letterman appearance, catapults to

onstage. “Hello,” she blares in her distinctive voice, “I’m Liza!” “I’m Madonna.” “I know, I know,” says Liza, “I’m a massive fan of your work!” “So am I,” Madonna says, hastily adding, “I mean of yours, of course.” Madonna turns and introduces me. “You were amazing,” I say to Liza. Liza gives us both a broad, toothsome grin. The dressing room door opens. Her grin immediately fades. A group of fans enter. Liza’s grin glitters again, only this time not at us. Madonna and I exchange glances.

and often feels pulled in too many directions. True to form, she tells me that she knows that my rage wasn’t directed at her at all, but that I was angry at the burden of being her brother—then adds that although she sympathizes with me, she isn’t going to apologize for that, since being her brother has also brought me great opportunity, which is undeniably true. Half of the letter, however, is Madonna outlining her insecurities to me and explaining that they were partly the reason for her

at age twelve and as an adult accumulated a $10 billion fortune by manufacturing steel. Having made a fortune beyond his wildest dreams, Carnegie returned to Scotland, determined to buy the castle of his dreams, and spent $2 million restoring and decorating Skibo. Since then, King Edward VII, Edward Elgar, Lloyd George, Helen Keller, Rudyard Kipling, and the Rockefellers have all stayed at Skibo. Moreover, Paderewski even played the vast organ in the Great Hall. I relish Skibo’s illustrious

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