Marx for the 21st Century (Routledge Frontiers of Political Economy)

Marx for the 21st Century (Routledge Frontiers of Political Economy)

Language: English

Pages: 220

ISBN: 0415547695

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This groundbreaking collection surveys current research on Marx and Marxism from a variety of perspectives. Setting forward an unconventional range of questions for discussion, the book develops key ideas, such as the theory of history, controversies about justice and the latest textual scholarship on The German Ideology. Written by Japanese scholars, the volume affords western readers a glimpse for the first time, of the results of many years’ debates and discussion.

Following the long tradition of Japanese interest in Marx, the book draws on the relationship between that and radical changes in local political context, as well as the economic and political development represented by Japan. Over the course of the chapters, Marx is rescued from ‘orientalism’, evaluated as a socialist thinker, revisited as a theorist of capitalist development and heralded as a necessary corrective to modern economics. Of particular interest are the major scholarly revisions to the ‘standard’ historical accounts of Marx’s work on the Communist Manifesto, his relationship to the contemporary theories of Louis Blanc and P.J. Proudhon, and new information about how he and Engels worked together.

This landmark work opens up a world of Japanese critical engagement and lively scholarship that will appeal to anyone interested in Marx and Marxism.

The Concept of Nature in Marx

The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry into the Origins of Cultural Change

Gramsci is Dead: Anarchist Currents in the Newest Social Movements

State, Space, World: Selected Essays

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

unity based on the commune (Blanc 1841: 65). He further notes that ‘Social unity does not have any basis except that of association. To think, demand, and act jointly comprises association in its strictest, widest meaning’ (Blanc 1841: 60). It is clear that in this article he envisions associations merging with local communities where people have ‘frequent, customary and almost daily relations’, but the reason why such a merging should come about is never stated clearly (Blanc 1841: 60). Here it

economics and ethics’ (1992: 8). References Arie, D. (1990) Labour and Justice: A History of Socio-Economic Ideas from Aristotle to Roemer (Japanese). Tokyo: Sofusha Press. Aristotle (1934) The Nicomachean Ethics, trans. by H. Rackham. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Aronson, R. (1995) After Marxism. New York: Guildford Press. Backhouse, R. (1985) A History of Modern Economic Analysis. Oxford: Blackwell. Baldwin, J.W. (1959) ‘The medieval theory of the just price: Romanists, Canonists,

Specialized branches of political economy . . . must all presuppose the stages-theory of capitalist development; for these specialized branches study the various aspects of the capitalist economy . . . in the light of the world-historic ‘type’ . . . Finally, with all these preparations, political economy can apply itself to its ultimate aim, namely, the empirical analysis of the actual state of capitalism either in the world as a whole or in each different country. (Uno 1980: xxiii) A

to do so, but also in terms of the system of thought characteristic of the workers’ associations of the July Monarchy. Skilled workers served as the sole force behind the Paris labour movement at the time, and associationism was built upon the foundation provided by the homogeneity of skilled workers (Moss 1976: 9–16). Buchez had clearly stated that factory workers, who were no more than cogs in a machine, were not suited to serving as the foundation upon which workers’ associations would be

to do so, but also in terms of the system of thought characteristic of the workers’ associations of the July Monarchy. Skilled workers served as the sole force behind the Paris labour movement at the time, and associationism was built upon the foundation provided by the homogeneity of skilled workers (Moss 1976: 9–16). Buchez had clearly stated that factory workers, who were no more than cogs in a machine, were not suited to serving as the foundation upon which workers’ associations would be

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