Three Negro Classics: Up From Slavery; The Souls of Black Folk; The Autobiography of an Ex-colored Man

Three Negro Classics: Up From Slavery; The Souls of Black Folk; The Autobiography of an Ex-colored Man

W. E. B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Booker T. Washington

Language: English

Pages: 516

ISBN: B003E782PG

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


UP FROM SLAVERY

The autobiography of Booker T. Washington is a startling portrait of one of the great Americans of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The illegitimate son of 'a white man and a Negro slave, Washington, a man who struggled for his education, would go on to struggle for the dignity of all his people in a hostile and alien society.

THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK

W.E.B. DuBois's classic is a major sociological document and one of the momentous books in the mosaic of American literature. No other work has had greater influence on black thinking, and nowhere is the African-American's unique heritage and his kinship with all men so passionately described.

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN EX-COLORED MAN

Originally published anonymously, James Weldon Johnson's penetrating work is a remarkable human account of the life of black Americans in the early twentieth century and a profound interpretation of his feelings towards the white man and towards members of his own race. No other book touches with such understanding and objectivity on the phenomenon once called "passing" in a white society.

These three narratives, gathered together in Three Negro Classics chronicle the remarkable evolution of African-American consciousness on both a personal and social level. Profound, intelligent, and insightful, they are as relevant today as they have ever been.

The Autobiography of Booker T. Washington is a startling portrait of one of the great Americans of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The illegitimate son of a white man and a Negro slave, Washington, a man who struggled for his education, would go on to struggle for the dignity of all his people in a hostile and alien society.W.E.B. DuBois's classic is a major sociological document and one of the momentous books in the mosaic of American literature. No other work has had greater influence on black thinking, and nowhere is the African-American's unique heritage and his kinship with all men so passionately described.Originally published anonymously, James Weldon Johnson's penetrating work is a remarkable human account of the life of black Americans in the early twentieth century and a profound interpretation of his feelings towards the white man and towards members of his own race. No other book touches with such understanding and objectivity on the phenomenon once called "passing" in a white society.These three narratives, gathered together in Three Negro Classics, chronicle the remarkable evolution of African-American consciousness on both a personal and social level. Profound, intelligent, and insightful, they are as relevant today as they have ever been.

* Raw scan PDF with OCRed text by the Internet Archive.

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in this matter. I had been directed by the authorHampton to stop at a certain hotel in Washington with my charge, but when I went to this hotel the clerk stated that he would be glad to receive the Indian into the house, but said that he could not accommodate me. An illustration of something of this same feeling came under my observation afterward. I happened to find myself in a town in which so much excitement and indignaities at were being expressed that it seemed likely for a time would be a

highsounding things that they had studied. While they could locate the Desert of Sahara or the capital of China on an artificial globe, I found out that the girls could not locate the proper places for the knives and forks on an actual dinner-table, or the places on which the bread and meat should be set. I had to summon a good deal of courage to take a respects, Up From Slavery student who had been 95 studying cube root and "banking and discount," and explain to him that the wisest thing

to another in this way, until at the present time a building of any description or size can be constructed wholly by our instructors and students, from the drawing of the plans to the putting in of the electric fixtures without going off the grounds for a single set workman. Not a few times, when a new student has been led into the temptation of marring the looks of some building by leadpencil marks or by the cuts of a jack-knife, I have heard an old student remind him: "Don't do that. That is

increased the number of branches of the NAACP from sixty-eight to three hundred and ten. In 1920 he* became general secretary of the organization, a position he was to hold for a decade. Johnson's finest hour as a race leader came in his effort to secure the passage of the Dyer Anti-lynching Bill by the United States Congress. For two years, 1921-1922, he lobbied in Washington to persuade members of Congress to vote for the bill. Its passage by the House of Representatives was due in no small

sympathy with each other. It seems to me that there is rarely such a combination of mental and physical delight in any effort as that which comes to a public speaker when he feels that he has a great audience completely within his control. There is a thread of sympathy and oneness that connects a public speaker with his audience, that is just as strong as though it was something tangible and visible. If in an Up From Slavery 161 audience of a thousand people there is one person who not in

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