Why Do Men Fall Asleep After Sex?: More Questions You'd Only Ask a Doctor After Your Third Whiskey Sour

Why Do Men Fall Asleep After Sex?: More Questions You'd Only Ask a Doctor After Your Third Whiskey Sour

Mark Leyner, Billy Goldberg

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 0307345971

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Doctor Is In . . . Again!

Did the mega-bestselling Why Do Men Have Nipples? exhaust your curiosity about stuff odd, icky, kinky, noxious, libidinous, or just plain embarrassing? No, you say? Well, good, because the doctor and his able-bodied buddy are in! Again! Mark Leyner and Billy Goldberg, M.D., now take on the differences between the sexes—those burning questions like Why doesn’t my husband ever listen? or Why does my wife ALWAYS have to pee? And of course, Why do men fall asleep after sex?, plus plenty of others to keep you fully informed.

Full of smart and funny answers to an onslaught of new questions, all in a do-ask-we’ll-tell spirit that entertain and teaches you something at the same time, Why Do Men Fall Asleep After Sex? offers the real lowdown on everything everyone wants to know about all things anatomical, medical, sexual, nutritional, animal, and mineral, but would only ask a physician after a few too many, like:

• Why do you have a “bionic” sense of smell when you’re pregnant?

• Does peeing in the shower cure athlete’s foot?

• Is a dog’s mouth clean?

• Can you breastfeed with fake boobs?

• Does thumb sucking cause buckteeth?

• Do your eyebrows grow back if shaved?

Bigger, funnier, and better than ever, Why Do Men Fall Asleep After Sex? proves that in the battle of the sexes, as in most things, a little Q&A is a safe, effective, minimally invasive remedy.

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external ear causes great pain and anxiety. In the ER, we first put mineral oil or Lidocaine (an anesthetic liquid) in the ear to suffocate the trespassing creature. We then employ an “alligator forceps”—a long, thin tweezerlike instrument to pull the intruder out. HOW DO WE KNOW THAT DOGS ARE COLOR-BLIND? I imagine it would be very difficult to get the dog to sit still at the eye doctor long enough to find out. So how do we know that dogs are colorblind? To begin with, they aren’t. They

may actually have gained currency as the result of the widespread practice of giving racehorses a drug called furosemide prior to a race. Ostensibly a preventive measure for exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhaging (EPIH), the drug has also been found to have a clear performance-enhancing effect. Why? Probably because furosemide is a diuretic—it makes you piss—and horses given furosemide lose about twenty pounds of their pre-race body weight through urination. And, at the track, lighter means

opening of the eustachian tubes. If these don’t work, pinch your nostrils shut, take a mouthful of air, and blow. Decongestants and some nasal sprays also help ease the passage of air, especially if you are already congested. CHAPTER 7 WOMEN WANT TO KNOW We had finished a long morning of patients and Leyner had taken our receptionist Wendy out to lunch. I was catching up on paperwork when I realized that several hours had passed since they’d left. I called his cell phone but when I heard

One afternoon, on the way home from school, I’d followed a squirrel into the woods. (As an itinerant child who was typically friendless, I often found great solace in the companionship of small helpless creatures.) There I was with my fey Truman Capote blond bangs and sparkly anime eyes, and as I tried to lure the squirrel closer with a tiny marzipan banana that my mother had packed as a surprise in my lunch that day, I was set upon by a pack of boys in blue uniforms. Crazed, sadistic Cub Scouts.

sweetheart, the ventral tegmental area and the caudate nucleus lit up. The caudate nucleus is the site of a dense network of receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine. Donatella Marazziti, a psychiatry professor at the University of Pisa in Italy, measured the serotonin levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the blood of people who’d been in love for several months and who pine or are otherwise preoccupied with their lovers for at least four hours a day. She found that the serotonin levels

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